Woman who convinced boyfriend to kill himself faces sentencing

Laura Christensen
August 4, 2017

"Some people think she should get 20 years because what she did was just so terrible", Medwed said. You're just making it harder on yourself by pushing it off.

CARTER: You're so hesitant because you keeping over thinking it and keep pushing it off. "You're ready and prepared".

"This court finds that instructing Mr. Roy to get back in the truck constituted wanton and reckless conduct by Ms. Carter, creating a situation where there is a high degree of likelihood a high degree of harm would result to Mr. Roy", Moniz said while reading the verdict in June.

"Whether she appeals will depend on what she gets". The maximum possible sentence is 20 years. Manslaughter across the country is a unique kind of crime. Judge Moniz could have sentenced Carter to up to 20 years in prison. "You kept pushing it off and you say you'll do it, but you never do", Carter texted Roy in the early morning on the day of his death.

"There's a substantial body of neuroscience that talks about the judgment of 17- and 18-year-olds, that suggests that whoever they are at this point is very different than who they are later on", Gertner said.

The teen's lawyers argued she suffered from mental illness at the time.

The American Civil Liberties Union of MA, which argued against Carter's prosecution, said there is no criminal statute against encouraging someone to kill themselves.

"The judge found she should have intervened, and that's also an unusual finding". "In Massachusetts ... you have no legal obligation to intervene".

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The judge's conclusion was particularly unexpected, several lawyers said, because MA is one of a few states that do not explicitly outlaw encouraging or persuading someone to commit suicide.

"This conviction exceeds the limits of our criminal laws and violates free speech protections guaranteed by the MA and U.S. Constitutions", Matthew Segal, legal director at the ACLU of MA, said.

"How could Michelle Carter behave so viciously and encourage my son to end his life?" It both highlighted the dangers of cyber bullying and raised concerns among civil liberties advocates who argued that prosecutors and the judge overreached by finding Carter guilty for her speech. The verdict was surprising for another reason: No firm evidence was presented in court to prove what Carter had actually said to Roy in those final moments.

Before trial, the case went all the way to the Supreme Judicial Court. Joseph Cataldo, her defense lawyer, declined to provide a comment to BuzzFeed News before the sentencing.

"I think she needs to be held responsible for her actions 'cause she knew exactly what she was doing and what she said", Roy told Erin Moriarty.

The judge also ordered that Carter could not profit from the death of Roy. "[The defense] wanted to minimize [the emotion] by having a judge trial, but judges are human beings".

A MA judge ruled Carter was responsible for Conrad Roy III's death because she had placed him in a situation that led to his suicide in a landmark case that made national headlines.

Other reports by My Hot News

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